A Culture Of Curiosity

A Culture Of Curiosity

One of our many curious Slack chats.

One of our many curious Slack chats.

When I joined 42courses.com (and I was the most recent addition to the team) I knew I was joining a band of misfits. Being an oddball myself, this is part of the reason Chris invited me to the party. Even so, I had no idea how entertaining it would be behind the scenes.

Day-to-day at 42courses.com involves a few google-esque elements of startup life (open plan workspace, Chris always provides sweets, side projects are encouraged, and there has been a hoverboard zooming around…) but that’s not what I’m talking about.

What I absolutely love about my team is that they’re all nerds.

The nature of our work – creating courses with brands and thought leaders – means that we are constantly learning new things in vast amounts very quickly. To some that might seem like punishment rather than pleasure, but for us nerds, it’s the best job in the world.

You see, it’s not all textbooks and facts. Our MO is to make learning as fun as possible, so when we deep dive into research on behavioural economics, fintech, entrepreneurship, the internet of things, or whatever our next course is, we look for the interesting stories. The did-you-knows. The anecdotes so fascinating, you can’t wait to tell someone else. These are the nuggets of gold that make learning, and my work days, just smashing.

Jake in particular goes beyond the call of duty in this regard. Relentlessly curious and a voracious reader, he often lifts his head to tell us the most intriguing anecdotes.

Just yesterday he enlightened us that, thanks to the Similarity Bias, star basketball player Jeremy Lin (Asian) has been constantly undervalued because he doesn’t fit the preconceived mental picture of what a star basketball player looks like. (shameless plug...learn all about biases in the Behavioural Economics course with Rory Sutherland)

Jake will be telling many such tales on this blog, so believe me, you want to stay tuned.

While I’m reading a book about maths for fun, and Chris can’t resist showing TED talks to his dates, I’m well aware that learning like this isn’t everyone’s cup of tea.

We try to make learning fun so that we can engage as many people as possible, but at the end of the day, as Simon Sinek says, "The goal is to do business with people who believe what you believe."

We believe in curiosity. Do you?

The Difference Between Idea vs Vision

The Difference Between Idea vs Vision